USS ZAVALA NCC-100101

Welcome to the USS ZAVALA, awarded Shuttle of the Year in 2011! Member of Starfleet International Region 3 serving South East Texas

Welcome to the USS ZAVALA, awarded Shuttle of the Year in 2011! Member of Starfleet International Region 3 serving South East Texas

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Welcome

Welcome to Starfleet Region 3’s best ship, the USS Zavala NCC – 100101

A Proud Star Trek Tradition Since 1974
STARFLEET is the oldest continuously operating Star Trek Fan Organization in the world. Founded back in 1974, when there were only 79 original live-action Star Trek episodes and no movies yet, STARFLEET has grown over the years to thousands of members. We’re all about having fun, making friends, and keeping the ideals of Star Trek alive and healthy into the future.

Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101

The Zavala serves South East Texas mostly in the Houston/Galveston Area. We meet monthly on the third Sunday of each month. We give back to the community through charity and service and promote the ideals and dream of Star Trek and Gene Rodenberry.
Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101
Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101 commented on their own link.February 13th, 2015 at 10:39pm
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Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101
Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101 created an event.February 10th, 2015 at 4:55am
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Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101
Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101February 6th, 2015 at 3:04pm
Planetary society creates light sail ship http://wp.me/p1Zwma-d0k
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Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101
Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101 shared NASA Goddard's video: Hubble's High-Definition Panoramic View of the Andromeda Galaxy.February 5th, 2015 at 3:32am
Hubble's High-Definition Panoramic View of the Andromeda Galaxy
Zoom into the Andromeda galaxy The largest NASA Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled, this sweeping view of a portion of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) is the sharpest large composite image ever taken of our galactic neighbor. Though the galaxy is over 2 million light-years away, the Hubble telescope is powerful enough to resolve individual stars in a 61,000-light-year-long section of the galaxy's pancake-shaped disk. It's like photographing a beach and resolving individual grains of sand. And, there are lots of stars in this sweeping view — over 100 million, with some of them in thousands of star clusters seen embedded in the disk. This ambitious photographic cartography of the Andromeda galaxy represents a new benchmark for precision studies of large spiral galaxies which dominate the universe's population of over 100 billion galaxies. Never before have astronomers been able to see individual stars over a major portion of an external spiral galaxy. Most of the stars in the universe live inside such majestic star cities, and this is the first data that reveal populations of stars in context to their home galaxy. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)
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Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101
Starship USS Zavala NCC-100101February 5th, 2015 at 3:30am
The moon from the other side...
The far side of the moon, like the side we can see from Earth, goes through a complete cycle of phases. But unlike the side we can see, the terrain of the far side is quite different. Learn more: http://go.nasa.gov/1KcDj1C & www.nasa.gov/lro The far side of the moon lacks the large dark spots, called maria, that make up the familiar Man in the Moon on the near side. Instead, craters of all sizes crowd together over the entire far side. The far side is also home to one of the largest and oldest impact features in the solar system, the South Pole-Aitken basin, visible here as a slightly darker bruise covering the bottom third of the disk. The far side was first seen in a handful of grainy images returned by the Soviet Luna 3 probe, which swung around the Moon in October, 1959. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, was launched fifty years later, and since then it has returned hundreds of terabytes of data, allowing LRO scientists to create extremely detailed and accurate maps of the far side. Those maps were used to create the imagery seen here. More on Facebook here: httpsa//httpsa//www.facebook.com/LunarReconnaissanceOrbiteraaahttpsa//www.facebook.com/
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